Peter Drucker: Ask Questions

Drucker’s work at GE is instructive. It was never his style to bring CEOs clear, concise answers to their problems but rather to frame the questions that could uncover the larger issues standing in the way of performance. “My job,” he once lectured a consulting client, “is to ask questions. It’s your job to provide […]

Read More Peter Drucker: Ask Questions

We must have a Catholic view of sin which, “produces a more systematic program for advancement in the spiritual life” and a Reformation view which views, “the conception of sin as a radical evil that fundamentally alters our relationship with God.

We must have a Catholic view of sin which, “produces a more systematic program for advancement in the spiritual life” and a Reformation view which views, “the conception of sin as a radical evil that fundamentally alters our relationship with God. Simon Chan

Read More We must have a Catholic view of sin which, “produces a more systematic program for advancement in the spiritual life” and a Reformation view which views, “the conception of sin as a radical evil that fundamentally alters our relationship with God.

With God’s grace we train to become like Jesus and grow in him so we can be his expression of love here and now. We become the kind of good we want to see in the world…the gospel should include a call to transformation in the present. (pg. 196)

With God’s grace we train to become like Jesus and grow in him so we can be his expression of love here and now. We become the kind of good we want to see in the world…the gospel should include a call to transformation in the present. (pg. 196) True Story, James Choung

Read More With God’s grace we train to become like Jesus and grow in him so we can be his expression of love here and now. We become the kind of good we want to see in the world…the gospel should include a call to transformation in the present. (pg. 196)

Oneness Pentecostals, who today comprise roughly one-fourth of all Pentecostals and are also known as “Jesus’ Name” Pentecostals, represent the most radical theological departure of any Pentecostal group. Essentially, these churches teach a unitarianism of the Son that denies the traditional doctrine of the Trinity and claims that Jesus is Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. They (re)baptize in Jesus’ name and are also the only major grouping of Pentecostals who teach (or at least imply) that speaking in tongues is necessary for salvation.

Oneness Pentecostals, who today comprise roughly one-fourth of all Pentecostals and are also known as “Jesus’ Name” Pentecostals, represent the most radical theological departure of any Pentecostal group. Essentially, these churches teach a unitarianism of the Son that denies the traditional doctrine of the Trinity and claims that Jesus is Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. […]

Read More Oneness Pentecostals, who today comprise roughly one-fourth of all Pentecostals and are also known as “Jesus’ Name” Pentecostals, represent the most radical theological departure of any Pentecostal group. Essentially, these churches teach a unitarianism of the Son that denies the traditional doctrine of the Trinity and claims that Jesus is Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. They (re)baptize in Jesus’ name and are also the only major grouping of Pentecostals who teach (or at least imply) that speaking in tongues is necessary for salvation.

When we take bread, bless it, break it, and give it with the words “This is the Body of Christ,” we express our commitment to make our lives conform to the life of Christ. We too want to live as people chosen, blessed, and broken, and thus become food for the world.

When we take bread, bless it, break it, and give it with the words “This is the Body of Christ,” we express our commitment to make our lives conform to the life of Christ. We too want to live as people chosen, blessed, and broken, and thus become food for the world. Henri Nouwen, Daily […]

Read More When we take bread, bless it, break it, and give it with the words “This is the Body of Christ,” we express our commitment to make our lives conform to the life of Christ. We too want to live as people chosen, blessed, and broken, and thus become food for the world.

The relation of the Church to Christ is not ‘like’ that of a man’s body to the man himself. It IS that of Christ’s body to the Lord Himself.” pg. 28

The relation of the Church to Christ is not ‘like’ that of a man’s body to the man himself. It IS that of Christ’s body to the Lord Himself.” pg. 28 Simon Chan

Read More The relation of the Church to Christ is not ‘like’ that of a man’s body to the man himself. It IS that of Christ’s body to the Lord Himself.” pg. 28