Depression and Mid Life Crisis of Faith

“For the majority, the midlife period may mean a crisis of faith of lesser proportions. You question your values, but there is no risk of abandoning one’s faith or family. You struggle to ignore your disillusionments, and your spirituality may suffer a little, but you plod on hoping that all will come right in the end. What is needed here? Hang on. This, too, will pass. Pray for a deep sense of understanding of what is going on within your spirit. Periods of doubt are normal for humans who “only see through a glass darkly.” Remember, this is your crisis not God’s. God hasn’t abandoned you. This is a time for Him to do His finest work in you, if you cooperate.”

Archibald Hart, Unmasking Male Depression

During this period of time, we need a spirituality of “hang in there”.  God will never leave us or forsake us.  Our values, senses, and beliefs are being refined.  Hold on!

Ronald Rolheiser Article: Living with Frustration and Tension

…too many of us were not taught that life is hard, that we have to spend most of it waiting in one kind of frustration or other, and that this is the natural state of things. Too many of us were given a false set of expectations. We were given the impression that indeed we could have it all, clear-cut joy without a shadow and full intimacy without frustration or distance.

From his article, “LIVING WITH FRUSTRATION AND TENSION”

Ronald Rolheiser

http://www.ronrolheiser.com/columnarchive/?id=509

We must have a Catholic view of sin which, “produces a more systematic program for advancement in the spiritual life” and a Reformation view which views, “the conception of sin as a radical evil that fundamentally alters our relationship with God.

We must have a Catholic view of sin which, “produces a more systematic program for advancement in the spiritual life” and a Reformation view which views, “the conception of sin as a radical evil that fundamentally alters our relationship with God.
Simon Chan

With God’s grace we train to become like Jesus and grow in him so we can be his expression of love here and now. We become the kind of good we want to see in the world…the gospel should include a call to transformation in the present. (pg. 196)

With God’s grace we train to become like Jesus and grow in him so we can be his expression of love here and now. We become the kind of good we want to see in the world…the gospel should include a call to transformation in the present. (pg. 196)
True Story, James Choung

Oneness Pentecostals, who today comprise roughly one-fourth of all Pentecostals and are also known as “Jesus’ Name” Pentecostals, represent the most radical theological departure of any Pentecostal group. Essentially, these churches teach a unitarianism of the Son that denies the traditional doctrine of the Trinity and claims that Jesus is Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. They (re)baptize in Jesus’ name and are also the only major grouping of Pentecostals who teach (or at least imply) that speaking in tongues is necessary for salvation.

Oneness Pentecostals, who today comprise roughly one-fourth of all Pentecostals and are also known as “Jesus’ Name” Pentecostals, represent the most radical theological departure of any Pentecostal group. Essentially, these churches teach a unitarianism of the Son that denies the traditional doctrine of the Trinity and claims that Jesus is Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. They (re)baptize in Jesus’ name and are also the only major grouping of Pentecostals who teach (or at least imply) that speaking in tongues is necessary for salvation.
Pneumatology, Veli-Matti Karkkainen

When we take bread, bless it, break it, and give it with the words “This is the Body of Christ,” we express our commitment to make our lives conform to the life of Christ. We too want to live as people chosen, blessed, and broken, and thus become food for the world.

When we take bread, bless it, break it, and give it with the words “This is the Body of Christ,” we express our commitment to make our lives conform to the life of Christ. We too want to live as people chosen, blessed, and broken, and thus become food for the world.
Henri Nouwen, Daily Bread